Wednesday's program description

Connecting to Action
Wednesday, June 30th

8:30 - 11:45

Using comparative analysis as a tool for evidence-based policy

Format

Workshop

Presenting NCC

National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health

Speakers

Mona Shum, Manager, NCCEH
Christina Chociolko, Network Coordinator, NCCEH
Karen Rideout, Knowledge Translation Scientist, NCCEH
Timothy Lambert, Executive Director of Health Protection, BC Ministry of Healthy Living and Sport

Learning Objectives

Participants will learn:

  1. How to identify the evidence related to existing policies

  2. How to identify evidence gaps in existing policies and what kind of evidence base is needed for a well-informed policy, using comparative analysis as a tool.

  3. How to identify contextual factors that influence the uptake of evidence into policy (or policy review/revision)

Description

The workshop will include :

  • A presentation providing background material and tools for evidence-based policymaking and comparative analysis.
  • An exercise using an example comparison of bottled water and tap water standards from several jurisdictions in Canada.  Participants will be able to apply tools learned from the first half of the workshop to determine evidence gaps in policies, possible consequences of not filling those gaps, what steps are needed to fill those gaps, and the pros and cons of filling those gaps.  Participants will be asked to consider what the policies are meant to achieve and whether or not they are structured in such a way as to achieve the intended outcome.
  • Question/answer period with participants


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8:30 - 11:45

Planning and Delivering Outreach to Vulnerable Populations

Format

Workshop

Presenting NCC

National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases

Speaker

Elsabé du Plessis, Project Manager, NCCID

Learning Objectives

  1. Define outreach
  2. Present outreach model and approach developed by NCCID
  3. Develop tools and strategies for reaching vulnerable populations

Description

At a forum hosted by NCCID in 2008, participants highlighted the need for a national perspective on outreach. The perspective needed to outline the components of ‘good' outreach programs while allowing room for flexibility and local adaptability. Participants also expressed a need for more information about current Canadian programs.

NCCID developed a guide for those involved in planning and managing outreach programs in health authorities and community organizations. In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the outreach model and program framework and have the opportunity to work through some of the questions posed in planning outreach programs. The session will focus on defining outreach and how to decide if it is the most appropriate response. Accessing necessary evidence to make program decisions will be a key objective of the workshop. Participants will leave the workshop with a deeper understanding of outreach and the issues associated with planning an outreach program for a specific population group and context. Participants will also be introduced to an evidence-based approach to planning and evaluating outreach programs.

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8:30 - 11:45

Creating Change in First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Child Health

Format

Workshop

Presenting NCC

National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health

Speakers

Margo Greenwood, Academic Lead, NCCAH
Charlotte Reading, University of Victoria 
Shirley Tagalik , Inukpaujaq Consulting
Patricia Makokis, Blue Quills First Nations College
Sharon Steinhauer, Blue Quills First Nations College

Learning Objectives

  1. To explore ways of conceptualizing and contextualizing First Nations, Inuit, and Métis child health in Canada
  2. To provide an opportunity to apply conceptual models to current community concerns
  3. To gain knowledge and awareness of strategies to facilitate change in First Nations, Inuit, and Métis child health

Description

First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children bear a disproportionate burden of ill-health compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts, with significantly higher rates of infectious and chronic diseases, disability, and premature death. These health disparities are well known, longstanding, and largely influenced by socioeconomic, cultural, political, and environmental conditions outside the health system's direct control. Recent reports, including the 2009 Canadian Supplement to UNICEF's State of the World's Children: Aboriginal Children's Health – Leaving No Child Behind and Canada's Chief Public Health Officer's Report: Growing Up Well – Priorities for a Healthy Future, focus on childhood as the basis of health in adult life and an area where the greatest health impacts and health investments can be made. Making connections through knowledge and relationships, this workshop will explore how holistic, lifespan approaches can be used to facilitate change for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children in Canada.

A panel of researchers will conceptualize and contextualize a holistic lifespan approach to Aboriginal child health. Participants will have an opportunity to apply this approach to real life challenges in First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities.

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11:45 - 12:15

Lunch

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12:15 - 13:00

Public and Population Health: Evidence, Action, and Ethics

Format

Plenary

Speaker

Jason Scott Robert, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University

Description

Public and population health research and practice are fundamentally exercises in uncertainty: we have incomplete knowledge about dynamic populations and any action or intervention irreversibly alters the population dynamics such that we can test each intervention at most one time, helping to maintain the inadequacy of our knowledge base while simultaneously posing potential (and unpredictable) risks to individuals and communities. How, then, are we to proceed under these uncertain conditions? Dr. Robert will provide an overview of the notion of "wicked problems" as explored in the domain of planning, and use this notion as scaffolding to support case-study based conceptual, methodological, and ethical analysis of decision-making under uncertainty in public and population health.

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12:15 - 13:00

Making Connections for Public Health

Format

Closing Keynote

Speaker

Ronald Labonté, Canada Research Chair, Globalization and Health Equity, Institute of Population Health

Description

There has never been a better time than now in Canada for public health to get actively involved in setting the agenda for a healthier population. This requires not only connections with the right people, but access to current, applicable evidence and opportunities to turn information into action. This closing session will bring together the lessons you have learned throughout the Summer Institute. It will identify ways to effect change in public health by highlighting case examples from local, national, and global perspectives.

 

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